PhD

Scholarships

None in Three (www.noneinthree.org) is pioneering new ways to tackle violence against women and girls (GBV). With frontier technologies at its core and nested within a systems, public health prevention and public engagement strategy, this inter-disciplinary, cross-cultural research project is being extended to the UK. The UN (CEDAW GR No. 19) explicitly states that attitudes and practices which perpetuate violence against women should be addressed through appropriate public information and educational programmes. Recognising the importance of addressing such attitudes while they are being formed, the project’s central focus is the creation of an educational anti-violence computer game designed to increase GBV awareness and enhance empathy/non-adversarial problem-solving skills among young people.

The University of Huddersfield is pleased to announce two PhD Scholarships for studies related to this work in the UK.

Two full-time 3-year Scholarships, commencing 1st October 2017 are offered as follows:

  1. Full Scholarship for a study of Serious Gaming as an Education Strategy for Preventing Intimate Partner Violence Among Young People in the UK (this covers fees and a bursary of £14,553 per annum for three years of full-time study). Located in the School of Education and Professional Development, this study will be supervised by Professor Paul Miller, Professor of Educational Leadership and Management.
    The None in Three project brings together researchers and academics in order to develop an evidence-based of serious gaming as a strategy used in educational settings to promote respect for women and girls’ rights in particular and to create awareness of prevalence and impact of Intimate Partner Violence, in order to:
    1. Map the country-specific challenges and opportunities for tackling GBV in a range of educational settings in the UK;
    2. Create a culturally and age appropriate multimedia education programme which recognises and draws on students’ assets, knowledge and experiences to support their awareness of IPV and how to tackle it;
    3. Develop appropriate guidance and training material for teachers and school leaders for use with students in primary and secondary schools, and other educational settings;
    4. Work with young people, parents, teachers and school leaders to evaluate the use of serious gaming within the range of educational settings to ensure a user-centred, evidence -based system which supports the objectives of the project;
    5. Develop and disseminate a model of participatory design which can be used by teachers and school leaders in schools and other educational settings to support students’ involvement and the presence of their voice and perspectives in design processes for educational and community-based serious gaming projects.
  2. Full Scholarship for a qualitative study of Issues and Problems that Mitigate or Reinforce Intimate partner Violence among Young People in the UK (this covers fees and a bursary of £14,553 per annum for three years of full-time study). Located in the School of Human and Health Sciences, this study will be supervised by Dr Graham Gibbs, Reader in Social Research Methods

This study will use qualitative methods to investigate the distinctive and predominant forms of intimate partner violence impacting young people in the UK. Working with both victims and perpetrators, the research will establish what issues and problems exist, their aetiology, how they develop (by incident and by lifetime), the role of upbringing, culture and gender identity and other factors that mitigate or reinforce GBV. Data analysis should include standard thematic approaches and, if possible, some discourse analysis. Experience with the use of NVivo software will be an advantage. Using the knowledge derived from this research, the None in Three project will identify the particular focus to be addressed by the prosocial computer games that others will develop and the data this study collects will provide some of the narratives and roles that can be used in the game design.

Criteria:

Applicants are invited from suitably qualified candidates who have an interest in pursuing doctoral research on one of the topics above (please indicate which scholarship you are applying for on the application form). The successful candidate will meet the following criteria:

  • University entry requirements for PhD study
  • Research experience and/or training equivalent to Masters level
  • An orientation to the principles of child and family empowerment, social justice and human rights
  • A value position which locates responsibility for preventing child sexual abuse with adults
  • An ability to work independently (under supervision)
  • Satisfactory references and criminal conviction check
  • Be willing to undertake up to a maximum of 6 hours teaching/other duties per week as appropriate to experience and disciplinary background
  • The successful applicant must live in commuting distance from the University of Huddersfield.

Research Proposal:

The research proposal should be approximately 2000 words in length. It is expected that each of these doctoral studies will make a significant contribution to the prevention of intimate partner violence among adolescents in the UK. The proposal should:

  1. Provide an indication of the key theoretical, empirical or policy debates it plans to address
  2. Demonstrate some familiarity with the literature in the proposed area of study
  3. Outline the scope of the study as envisaged by the applicant and the research methods that could be employed
  4. Show how the study will inform policy or practice for the prevention of intimate partner violence within young peoples’ relationships
  5. Include a bibliography

Application Form:

Along with the research proposal, applicants are also required to submit an application form for PhD study (download application here (https://www.hud.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/).

Applicants should indicate on the application that they are applying for the ‘None in Three full scholarship’.

Selection will be based on the application form, the research proposal and a telephone interview.

Further Information:

Scholarship 2. Professor Paul Miller ( http://www-old.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffid=1556 . Email: p.miller@hud.ac.uk)

Scholarship 3. Dr Graham Gibbs ( http://www-old.hud.ac.uk/ourstaff/profile/index.php?staffid=507 , Email: g.r.gibbs@hud.ac.uk)

The closing date for applications is 30th August 2017. Interviews will be held the second week in September for an anticipated start date of October 1st 2017


PGR Statements

Dr Nicole Sherretts

Nicole Sherretts

As the measure of criminal social identity had never been validated in a Western context, the first aim of my thesis was to examine the construct validity and dimensionality of MCSI within a sample of American offenders, and with a combined dataset from Poland, Pakistan, and the United States (total N = 1,171). Confirmatory factor analyses revealed that a three-factor model of criminal social identity (cognitive centrality, in-group ties, and in-group affect) provided the best fit, within both combined and individual offender samples. Composite reliability indicated that the three factors were measured with very good reliability.

Utilising a sample of American offenders (N = 501), my thesis additionally investigated the role of prisonisation (as measured by time spent in prison), the criminal friend index, and four psychopathy factors (interpersonal manipulation, callous affect, erratic lifestyle, and antisocial behaviour) on criminal social identity (CSI), while controlling for age and gender. Findings indicated a significant moderating effect of interpersonal manipulation on the relationship between prisonisation and MCSI, for offenders who scored high (1 SD above the mean) on interpersonal manipulation, and for those who scored low (1 SD below the mean) on interpersonal manipulation. Also, the criminal friend index was significantly associated with in-group ties for high levels (1 SD above the mean) of callous affect.

Finally, my thesis sought to evaluate previously aforementioned psychosocial variables in different classes of inmates. Utilising a sample of 478 offenders (homicide offenders n = 94, recidivists n = 266, and first time incarcerated offenders n = 118) incarcerated in three correctional facilities in the US, findings revealed significant differences between the groups on four factors of psychopathy and three factors of criminal social identity.

Publications:

Sherretts, N., Boduszek, D., Debowska, A., & Willmott, D. (2017). Comparison of murderers with recidivists and first time incarcerated offenders from U.S. prisons on psychopathy and identity as a criminal: An exploratory analysis. Journal of Criminal Justice. DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2017.03.002 (ISSN 0047-2352).

Debowska, A., Boduszek, D., Dhingra, K., Sherretts, N., Willmott, D., & DeLisi, M. (2017). Can we use Hare’s Psychopathy Model within Forensic and Non-Forensic Populations? An Empirical Investigation. Deviant Behavior. DOI: 10.1080/01639625.2016.1266887 (ISSN 0163-9625).

Willmott, D., Mojtahedi, D., Ryan, S., Sherretts, N., Simpson, O., & Dlamini, T. (2017). Psychometric tests as a measure of Personality: A Critical Assessment of Trait versus Situationalist Positions and the NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). EC Psychology and Psychiatry, 3(1), 13-18.

Sherretts, N., Boduszek, D., & Debowska, A. (2016). Exposure to Criminal Environment and Criminal Social Identity in a Sample of Adult Prisoners: The Moderating Role of Psychopathic Traits. Law and Human Behavior, 40(4), 430-439. DOI: 10.1037/lhb0000188 (ISSN 0147-7307).

Sherretts, N., & Willmott, D. (2016). Construct Validity and Dimensionality of the Measure of Criminal Social Identity using Data drawn from American, Pakistani, and Polish inmates. Journal of Criminal Psychology, 6 (3), 134-143. DOI: 10.1108/JCP-07-2016-0020 (ISSN 2009-3829).

Willmott, D., & Sherretts, N. (2016). Individual Differences in Eyewitness Identification Accuracy between Sequential and Simultaneous Line-ups: Consequences for Police Practice and Jury Decisions. Current Issues in Personality Psychology, 4(4). DOI: 10.5114/CIPP.2016.62701 (ISSN 2353-561X).

Debowska, A., Boduszek, D., & Sherretts, N. (2016). Self-esteem in Adult Prison Population: The Development and Validation of the Self-Esteem Measure for Prisoners (SEM-P). Deviant Behavior. DOI: 10.1080/01639625.2016.1246034 (ISSN 0163-9625).

Lewis, K., Rodriguez, A., Kola, S. & Sherretts, N. (2016). Mental health and rugby football league: is enough being done to support players? Journal of Sports Sciences, 34 (sup1), p. i-s85. DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2016.1260807 (ISSN 0264-0414).

Ramy Mamdouh Hammady

Ramy Hammady

Visual influences of Virtual Guidance using Augmented Reality in the Egyptian museum in Cairo as a case study

Guiding people by visual communications in museums is one of the most essential keys to lead visitors and to enrich them with the knowledge of the exhibits’ context. The guidance in museums relies on a reliable source of information, which can feed visitors with a considerable amount of coherent information. However, the human tour guide can vary in quality from person to person and level of interaction based on their personal skills. In the Egyptian museum in Cairo, as a case study in this research, there is a lack of guidance methods as a substantial service except for the human guidance method. Moreover, there is no adequate guiding information over the antiques and there are difficulties in engaging people with the context of the exhibits.

Interactions between the guidance way and the visitors can facilitate retaining information and may strengthen the bonds between the exhibits and the interested visitors; furthermore, visual communications have the ability to do so. Museum visitors may learn from visual and acoustical stories related to particular artefacts, which are based on their interest. Moreover, visitors need to rely on accessible sources of information, supported with engaging content, interesting visuals to serve the visitor and leave a beneficial impression after leaving.

This project aims to find a substantial substitute particularly the cultural heritage. This project concerns building a smartphone application, which has the ability to yield a newly developed computer application and interaction technology called ‘Augmented Reality’ to guide and engage people inside museums with the utilisation of the power of visuals.

Publications:

1. Conference paper 'Augmented Reality and Gamification in Heritage Museums’, at Joint International Conference on Serious Games – Brisbane, Australia. Published as Chapter 17, Springer Link LNCS 2.

2. Journal paper 'User Experience of Markerless Augmented Reality Applications in Cultural Heritage Museums Case Study MuseumEye project’," paper submitted and under review.

Gill Kirkman

Gillian Kirkman

Can immersive, serious computer games positively impact on the prevention of intimate partner violence among young people? An Action Research Project on the Impact of Computer Games in Developing Victim Empathy and Improving Gender Relations among Young People in the UK.

Context: This action research project aims to develop and evaluate a gender sensitive, serious gaming intervention which facilitates attitude/behaviour change and builds empathy capacity and non-adversarial conflict resolution skills for different users/genders among young people.

Aim of Investigation: Using a mixed method approach, my PhD study will focus solely on a sample of young people (16-18 years old) in the UK, where no such intervention exists and where the problem of intimate partner violence among young people is increasingly being recognised as a serious problem and a child welfare issue. The study will have a gendered and child centred approach.

Dominic Willmott

Dominic Willmott

PhD Synopsis

My PhD research explored the problem of low rape conviction rates within the English Criminal Justice System. Examining the influence of psychological constructs upon individual juror decision making, the research involved re-enacting a rape trial with the use of professional actors and lawyers, to live panels of mock jury participants. With a sample in excess of 400 participants, latent profiling analysis displayed a relationship between psychological make-up and the verdict decisions jurors make during trial. Attitudes towards rape were also found to influence the verdict decisions jurors made, moderated by the degree of empathy held within each juror. Overall, the research displayed implicit bias to have a direct causal relationship upon the voting preferences of jurors within rape trials. Notably, as such a relationship has never been found before within the UK justice system, the findings have important implications for future prosecutions of rape and, more broadly, the legal procedures surrounding rape trials within England and Wales – ensuring victims of rape more readily obtain the justice they deserve.

Publications:

Debowska, A., Willmott, D., Boduszek, D. & Jones, A. (2017). What do we know about Child Abuse and Neglect Patterns of Co-occurrence? A Systematic Review of Profiling Studies and Recommendations for Future Research. Child Abuse and Neglect, 70, 100-111. DOI: 10.1016/j.chiabu.2017.06.014 (ISSN 0145-2134).

Boduszek, D., Debowska, A. & Willmott, D. (2017). Latent profile analysis of psychopathic traits among homicide, general violent, property, and white-collar offenders. Journal of Criminal Justice, 51, 17-23. DOI.ORG/10.1016/J.JCRIMJUS.2017.06.001 (ISSN 0047-2352).

Willmott, D., Boduszek, D. & Booth, N. (2017). The English Jury on Trial. Custodial Review, 82, 12-14.

Sherretts, N., Boduszek, D., Debowska, A. & Willmott, D. (2017). Comparison of murderers with recidivists and first time incarcerated offenders from U.S. prisons on psychopathy and identity as a criminal: An exploratory analysis. Journal of Criminal Justice. DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2017.03.002 (ISSN 0047-2352).

Debowska, A., Boduszek, D., & Willmott, D. (2017). Psychosocial correlates of attitudes towards male sexual violence in a sample of property crime, financial crime, general violent, and homicide offenders. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment. DOI:10.1177/1079063217691966 (ISSN 1079-0632).

Willmott, D. (2017). Jury Psychology. In B. Baker, R. Minhas, & L. Wilson (Eds.), Psychology and Law: Factbook (2nd ed.). European Association of Psychology and Law. (ISBN 9781326989651).

Willmott, D. & Oostinga, M. (2017). Scientific Jury Selection. In B. Baker, R. Minhas, & L. Wilson (Eds.), Psychology and Law: Factbook (2nd ed.). European Association of Psychology and Law. (ISBN 9781326989651).

Willmott, D., & Ioannou, M. (2017). A Narrative Based Model of Differentiating Rioters. Howard Journal of Crime and Justice, 56(1), 105-124. DOI: 10.1111/hojo.12194 (ISSN 2059-1098).

Debowska, A., Boduszek, D., Dhingra, K., Sherretts, N., Willmott, D., & DeLisi, M. (2017). Can we use Hare’s Psychopathy model within Forensic and Non-Forensic Populations? Empirical Investigation. Deviant Behavior. DOI: 10.1080/01639625.2016.1266887 (ISSN 0163-9625).

Willmott, D., Mojtahedi, D., Ryan, S., Sherretts, N., Simpson, O. & Dlamini, T. (2017). Psychometric tests as a measure of Personality: A Critical Assessment of Trait versus Situationalist Positions and the NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). EC Psychology and Psychiatry, 3(1), 13-18.

Boduszek, D., Debowska, A. and Willmott, D. (2017). A New Model of Psychopathy. Custodial Review, 81, 16-17.

Willmott, D. (2017). Is it Strange or is it Scary? Examining Salience and Arousal Explanations of the “Weapons Focus Effect”. Internet Journal of Criminology. (ISSN 2045 6743).

Willmott, D., & Sherretts, N. (2016). Individual Differences in Eyewitness Identification Accuracy between Sequential and Simultaneous Line-ups: Consequences for Police Practice and Jury Decisions. Current Issues in Personality Psychology, 4(4), 228-239. DOI:10.5114/CIPP.2016.62701 (ISSN 2353-4192).

Sherretts, N., & Willmott, D. (2016). Construct Validity and Dimensionality of the Measure of Criminal Social Identity using Data drawn from American, Pakistani, and Polish inmates. Journal of Criminal Psychology, 6(3), 134-143. DOI:10.1108/JCP-07-2016-0020. (ISSN: 2009-3829).

Willmott, D., and Boduszek, D. (2016). Rape on trial: The influence of jury bias on verdict outcome. The Justice Gap. Retrieved from http://thejusticegap.com/2016/09/rape-trial-influence-jury-bias-verdict-outcome/

Willmott, D. (2016). Is Jury Bias Preventing Justice for Rape Victims? The Conversation. (ISSN 2044-5032).

Megan Kenny

Megan Kenny

Title: Who’s Following You? Cyberviolence via social media

Research Question: To explore the behaviours which make up cyberviolence within a social media context, to identify the prevalence of victimisation and perpetration and to see if those engaging in, and/or experiencing, cyberviolence share similar risk factors.

Context: This project aims to build on existing research into online interpersonal offending by focusing on events which occur solely within online contexts rather than conceptualising cyberviolence as an extension of offline contact. This will hopefully allow for the development of knowledge about cyberviolence as a construct in its own right and promote a shift towards a focus on the theme/motivation of the event, rather than on application of offline definitions to online contexts.

Aim of Investigation: My PhD study utilises a mixed methods approach, featuring an anonymous online survey, to identify the prevalence of cyberviolence amongst a diverse sample of social media users, explore what behaviours make up instances of cyberviolence according to individuals reporting victimisation and/or perpetration, and identify potential similarities and distinctions between those perpetrating and being victimised by cyberviolence.